7 Tips to Create Your Perfect Author Newsletter

Sacha Black

Author NewsletterI hear parrots squawking the same mantra constantly: “Hear Ye! Hear Ye! The best way to drive book sales is through a subscriber list.”

Its that thing where you: create a newsletter, do book updates, bonus content and give your hard work away for free.

If you got books to sell, you need that list.

This made me do one of those gut busting groans. Seriously? I spend enough time writing posts instead of my novel, do I actually have to add something else to my seven hundred and forty-eight page to do list?

Apparently I do, and that means you do too.

I heard that message loud and clear, especially as I’ll be releasing books this year. So I made a subscriber list one of my goals and I’ve been busy rolling up my ‘bonus content’ sleeves. Finally I’ve created one and it’s ready and chock full of just that: bonus content, round ups, writers tools, recommendations, writing inspiration…

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18 Character Frustrations #writerslife #writer

BlondeWriteMore

Character Frustrations

Working with fictional folk can be hard and at times it can feel like you are herding cats.

Here are some situations which show how frustrating characters can be…

  1. Characters hijacking your story.
  2. Characters getting too big for their fictional boots.
  3. Fictional folk starting to say what they want.
  4. Characters talking amongst themselves.
  5. Attention seeking minor characters who start to take over the plot.
  6. Hot characters leading you astray and making you write unnecessary steamy scenes.
  7. Characters talking out loud in the early hours when you are trying to sleep.
  8. Characters taking on your view of the world and not listening, as you screech at the laptop ‘for goodness sake be yourself!’
  9. Dull and lifeless characters!
  10. Characters who have this annoying habit of asking a question and the question bothers you so much you end up writing reams and reams trying to answer it.
  11. Characters who start to morph into…

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writer’s digest: 5 reasons you should pitch to smaller markets

Smaller markets are not as bad as a lot of people make them out to be.

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/5-reasons-you-should-pitch-your-writing-to-smaller-markets

5 Reasons You Should Pitch Your Writing to Smaller Markets

The dream of every freelance writer is the “big get.” That is, writing for the largest, best-known markets we can land. Bigger markets, after all, mean more prestige and better money. But there also can be tremendous value in writing for smaller markets—something a lot of writers tend to forget as they chase bigger fish.


don-vaughan-featuredThis guest post is by Don Vaughan. Vaughan is a North Carolina–based freelancewriter and founder of Triangle Area Freelancers. You can connect with him at donaldvaughan.net. This post is fromWriter’s Digest magazine.

Not me. Like many of my colleagues, I write regularly for larger markets such as Boys’ Life, Military Officer and CURE, all of which pay quite well. But I still accept assignments from smaller publications when…

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5 Things To Do While Your Book is on Submission

Good advice.

Carly Watters, Literary Agent Blog

Submitting your book to agents is one thing. It’s a writer’s first time putting it all out there and the responses are varied.

However, when your agent submits your book to a publisher that’s a whole other level of stress. It can be exciting!Finally, it’s out there in the world. And it can be worrying…what happens to my project now?You might hear back from editors in a week or a few months. It could be good news or bad.

Here are 5 things to do while your book is on submission:

  1. Trust your agent. We have your best interests at heart, truly. If you don’t trust your agent then you shouldn’t have signed with them. Let us handle the submissions and worry about the business side. We will consult you on decisions. Pull together with your agent at this time because the bonding will happen.
  2. Vent with…

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Write Like You

re-blogged from lit world interviews

Lit World Interviews

I remember writing my first book, how I’d agonise over every sentence, desperately not wanting to commit some awful grammar faux pas.  I’d haul all my books off my bookshelves and examine them minutely for all sorts of perceived faults in my writing – like correct sentence structure and trying to figure out how my writing heroes managed to make me hear and see their characters so intensely, rather than just read words on pages.  This resulted in a horribly over-edited book, with bits constantly being taken out and replaced or moved around.  Hello grammar gremlin hell of the future.  They still pop up today.

Eventually I realised that no matter how famous the writers, none of them followed any particular pattern.  Some of them conveyed conversations using he said or she said.  Some of them used no attributives at all for dialogue, but you still managed to know who…

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7 Tools For Pacing A Novel

I found this trough Chris the Story Reading Ape and felt it deserved to be shared.

Shirley McLain

PACEPacing is a crucial component of fiction writing. After all, it’s important to keep your readers “hooked” throughout your story. Whether you are just getting started in writing or looking to break into fiction writing, you’ll need to know the basics of how to pace a novel. Read today’s tip of the day from Crafting Novels & Short Stories. In this excerpt written by Jessica Page Morrell, she explains what pacing is and seven ways to keep your story moving at the right pace.

What is Pacing in Fiction?

Pacing is a tool that controls the speed and rhythm at which a story is told, and the readers are pulled through the events. It refers to how fast or slow events in a piece unfold and how much time elapses in a scene or story. Pacing can also be used to show characters aging and the effects of time on…

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