Writing Links 2/2717

Where Genres Collide Traci Kenworth YA Author & Book Blogger

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Writing Links…2/27/17

Traci Kenworth

Fantasy/Dystopian/UF/Paranormal/SF:

MG/YA:

  1. http://www.adventuresinyapublishing.com/2017/02/promising-form-and-content-pt-3-how-to.html A look at openings.

Romance/Women’s Fiction:

  1. https://writerofftheleash.blogspot.com/2017/02/a-case-for-inspirational-romance.html Love is an extension of God’s love for us.
  2. http://www.superauthors.com/2017/02/paying-attention.html Find something positive from day to day. I need to do this more. Today, it was a Shamrock Shake.

Christian:

  1. http://www.novelrocket.com/2017/02/going-with-flow.html Trust the one who is in control.
  2. http://www.novelrocket.com/2017/02/making-it-real-research-before-you-write.html Do you visit the places you write about? Mine would be hard to do, for fantasy. But the historical ones are set near where I grew up.
  3. http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/fresh-approach-how-to-surprise-your-reader/ Take a direction they wouldn’t expect.
  4. https://stevelaube.com/book-favor-take-break/ Where do you take a break? Mine’s usually to relax with a book, or two, or more.
  5. http://www.novelrocket.com/2017/02/the-broken-blog.html Do you feel like your books a broken story?
  6. https://stevelaube.com/writing-controlled-fate/ Publishing is subjective and it all depends.
  7. http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/4-easy-steps-great-synopsis/ Write your synopsis before you write the book. A friend and critique partner taught me this and it’s invaluable! It seriously helps you to focus on…

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Conflict is More Important than Character

Steven Capps Writing

I know that this is an unpopular opinion. Truthfully, there are countless people who are smarter and more successful than I am, who believe the exact opposite. Up until a few days ago, I believed that of all the elements of a story the concept of character was, by far, the most integral element of a narrative. I am not saying that it is unimportant, but rather the idea of conflict has more power in creating a compelling narrative. It drives tension, creates depth, and is pervasive in every element of skilled storytelling. To kick off this discussion, I want to present my view of character.

Character: The Lens of the Reader

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Characters are representations of people who have a role in a story. I argue that in order to qualify as a character, the person depicted actually has to engage in some sort of activity relevant to the Point of View…

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‘You get an idea and… it just grows’ – interview with book and writing blogger Michelle Dunton

Nail Your Novel

michelle-intToday I’m at Michelle Dunton’s Youtube channel, talking about ideas, where they come from and how they end up as books. Michelle’s been reading my novels and decided to pick my brains for her podcast. One question of hers I particularly liked: she asked how a first-time fiction author should start writing a book. Should it be the characters, the plot, what? My answer: ‘start with something you can’t stop thinking about’. And from there, everything flows – as it does in this discussion. Do hop over.

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12 Similarities Between Making Pizza & Writing #SundayBlogShare #AmWriting

BlondeWriteMore

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After spending a considerable amount of time daydreaming about making a delicious pizza, I thought I would try to think up some similarities between making pizza and writing.

Some writing blogs out there are probably talking about fancy writing techniques and here at BlondeWriteMore we are talking pizza!  Sigh..

For noting: After writing this post I raced off to stuff my face with pizza…you have been warned!

Here are those 12 similarities:

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Do writers really put you in their books? #amwriting #writing

G.L. Cromarty

Some writers (A) are very open about putting people they know in their book, whether it is revenge (never be mean to a writer), or for less nefarious reasons (I admire you, I love you, I like you, you are fun, you are interesting).

Some writers (B) deny all, even vague, linkage between real people and the fictional characters in their book.

I’m going to let you into a secret. If you know a writer . . . you are almost certainly, okay definitely, in their book!

So, are these writers (B) lying? Are they seeking to mislead you?

No, not really, it’s more of a—subconscious inclusion—that a writer cannot possibly help.

The thing is, that a writer crafts their story out of their imagination, which is made up of everything they have ever seen, everything they have ever heard, and everything they have ever read. And while much of this input is from…

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